Executive Committee Meeting 2/20/18

Yes!And Executive Committee Meeting
2/20/18

6:30 PM

Present: Jeff, D’vorah, Claudia, Adam, Robin, Michael
Minutes:

  • Board Member concerns:
    • Marcella:Has left the Board.
      • She misunderstood that it was a 3 year term
      • Do we need to consider new board member:
        • We are fine at this point – we have enough members
        • Meredith is working with Michael to come up with some more members
      • D’vorah, would you please follow up with Ifiya?
    • Develop better process for communication between committee chairs and board chairs
      • Need a more uniform process
      • Better email follow up as part of the requirements of the Board
      • Michael can give everyone their own YesAndCamp email address – but it can’t be used for anything else
      • We can develop an Org chart
    • In terms of organization, we should have the events committee which is separate from the Resource and Development Committee
      • We should be paying attention to Donor Relations
  • WSOT update – VIP event and board challenge:
    • Thomas will speak
    • We have $5000 committed by the board and by a donor
    • Lots of new people! About 80 expected
  • Board Retreat Agenda:
    • Will be under separate cover
  • Next Meeting:
    • April 17, 2018 6:30 – Location TBA

Gearing up for WSOT 2018: The Song of Silence

One of the most popular questions we have about our Winter Sort of Thing shows is how we pick the themes and topics we’ll explore in this year’s production. While our Artistic Director Brooke Sexton is mostly to credit, we all get to mine and explore and enjoy (as artists) the themes she thinks up.

For me, the theme of The Song of Silence is in direct relationship to the times we are living in. It takes the concept of a “wall” and then teases it out to its natural conclusion. One of the things that makes old Colliwomple a “great” town is how much activity it has. The town is situated at a popular crossroads and everyone loves coming in and out, staying for a while, and moving on. When some of the town’s young people begin to leave, seek their fame and fortune outside of Colliwomple’s borders, some of the town feared a mass migration. This fear led to the wall. For a time the safety of the isolation was welcome by the older residents. Then it became “just the way it is” until a group of kids started asking “why.”

For us, working with kids, we realize that they are the best at asking “why.” Why are things the way they are? De we have to keep doing it that way? Kids are natural dreamers and, if we listen to their dreams, we can find inspiration. For those of us in this work, these kids inspire us every day.

All of our shows are told through the lens of these young people. We think that, while many of the stories we tell with them have universal themes, there is a particular gift the audience receives from seeing the world through their eyes. This story would not be the same if it were a bunch of older people, stuck in their ways, full of fear themselves. We definitely trade on the passion, and unearned confidence of these youth to see that a better world is possible – in Colliwomple – and here too. This isn’t a group of actors pretending to be young, this experience is watching young people, giving them agency, and watching them succeed with a huge story. As a program, we are so proud of the ways in which they take risks, go big, and learn new skills. As a performance, we think that a wide audience will enjoy watching a story well told, and relevant for the times we live in.

Check out this new video from one of our teen Shadow cast members:

Meet Cayla, New Marketing Intern

I am excited to introduce myself as a marketing intern for Yes! And… Collaborative Arts! I am completing my internship through Drexel University, where I am a sophomore Communication major. Any promotional material for YACA that you see throughout the fall and winter seasons may have been designed by me. I am also working to help make sure that events run smoothly and successfully.

Not only am I interested in marketing and PR for nonprofits, but I also have a long history of involvement in the arts that drew me right to YACA and its message. When I was young, I spent my time jumping between theatre, vocal performance and dance. In the past few years, I have picked up cosplay and costume design as a way to keep myself connected to other creators as well as my own creativity. I can attest to how just important the arts are to a developing child, and how collaborating with other artists can help them cultivate relationships that build into the future.

I am also a strong advocate for social justice, which makes YACA something that I am proud to be a part of. Growing up in Houston, I have lived around and experienced incredibly diverse communities with beautiful and unique ways of expressing themselves through the arts, and I feel that this is a wonderful away of contributing.

Hopefully I will get to witness the hard work of the YACA campers for myself soon. In the meantime, I am eager to learn all that I can about marketing for nonprofits as well as more about the positive impact that the arts have on young lives.

We are not “child care”

By: Michael Brix, Executive Director 

2017 Theatre Campers
2017 Theatre Campers

Last night, I had the pleasure of sitting with a group of our key staff members. Our key staff members are, by and large, young artists with a passion for young people. They are seasonal and part-time, but 10 of them came out to make our company better. We were led by 2 board members, one of which a founding member of Yes! And… Collaborative Arts and the other a founding board member. Together we talked for 3 hours about our work, our commitment to diversity and how to describe that commitment, as well as ways to make our programs stronger for both staff and kids.

In the middle of their discussion, I thought back to a conversation I had with a Summer Camp parent a few weeks ago at the Mt. Airy Village Fair. Her child had been a part of Imagination Camp in the past, and this year was due to move up to our middle school Theatre Camp. She wound up not registering and sending her child because their friend couldn’t sign up for a multi-week program and the child wanted to attend with their friend.

Sidenote: If you’re not familiar with our programs, our K-4th grade Imagination Camp is offered in week-long sessions. Our middle school Theatre Camp is 2 or 3 week-long sessions.

Like many parents, she inquired as to why we require multi-week sessions for middle schoolers and I gave a quick answer: Well, we’re not child care.

I don’t have anything against good quality child care and I typically don’t like defining us by what we are not, but I like how clear and unequivocal the statement is. We have worked for close to 20 years on developing a pedagogy and praxis for using the arts to empower children and youth. (We even named it: “Tribe Centered Learning.”)

Through this pedagogy, we program our day, our week, and our multi-week sessions to be age-appropriate, challenging, arts-driven explorations of community, imagination, and equality. This is not simply child care.

We work, not only to give these youth a voice, but to train them to use their voice, tell their stories, and find their power. We work so that young people who come to us for a few weeks in the summer will grow together, learn about how they fit into community, and have agency to change the world around them.

Shadow Company folk
Some high school Shadow Company members

We hope, that by requiring them to join us for multiple weeks in the summer, they will leave hungry to continue with us year-round; that the relationships they build with each other and our amazing staff compels them to join Winter Sort of Thing, or After School Group, and (eventually) Shadow Company. We are seeking life-long connections and so we are not just child care.

We make sure no child is left behind because they can’t afford it. This summer, it was to the tune of $100,000 in “camperships.” It’s also why we ask families who can afford it, to help us in our mission by pitching in financially so we can keep our population economically diverse.

I am making an open invitation to you, no matter if you got here because you are an internet browser, or Facebook story clicker, or blog junkie: JOIN US! Join us by making a contribution today. Our program model needs your assistance to make it work for all youth. A gift of $315 can give one child a week of programming. Can you help us continue in our mission today?

Click here to give now!

And when someone asks why you donated to the kids at Yes! And… Collaborative Arts, you can say it’s because “they are more than just child care.”

Thanks so much!

Meet Cassidy, New Office Intern

From Cassidy Kapps-Gibson, new Office Admin. Intern

I’d like to introduce myself as a new intern here at Yes! And…Collaborative Arts. I am doing my internship, from September to late March, via Drexel University, where I am a sophomore English major. I am focusing on nonprofit office administration. If you call into YACA during the fall or winter seasons there is a good chance I will answer your call. Besides that, I am carrying out day-to-day office tasks, as well as working on the YACA website and blog. I am really excited to learn more about nonprofit organization, as well as Yes! And… as a whole.

Almost all aspects of Yes! And… drew me to work here. I’ve been around arts and social justice-based nonprofits all my life, so the atmosphere is familiar to me. To this end, art is one of the most important things in my life. Having been raised by two phenomenal visual and performance artists, I myself am a collage artist and photographer and am interested in art therapy, as well as the arts as a form of education.

Hailing from West Philadelphia, I attended a grade school that valued community arts initiatives and worked closely with small arts organizations around West Philly. I also attended a creative and performing arts high school as a creative writing major.

I haven’t gotten the chance to be around the campers at YACA as of yet, but I am excited to attend events and learn more about the benefits of art in education and development.